Print Newspapers Are A Hit After Historic Elections

Print newspapers might be slowly disappearing like home telephones but not necessarily especially after the elections.

 

Remembering the historic win of Barack Obama in 2008 and the morning after Election Day, extra copies will be printed for newspapers and short-term newspaper stands will be set up this year. Whether the country elects the reality star or the first woman president, it doesn’t matter.

 

A tangible keepsake                                   

 

Although a lot of people are depending online and on apps for news, this doesn’t quite have that same edge over a newspaper’s front page.

 

As an American University professor who specializes in technology and language interplay, Naomi Baron explains how most people hold to some things that are reminiscent of previous experiences. Examples are theater programs, shells from the beach or campaign buttons.

 

A tangible version like that of a newspaper that recounts President John F. Kennedy’s assassination or a life changing event like what happened with 9/11 is an add-on to the keepsakes that are irreplaceable which apps or websites cannot provide.

 

The demand for newspapers

 

Eight years back, newspapers were left off-guard when many wanted to have keepsake copies given the dramatic headlines and huge photos that declared Obama the 1st African-American president. Everything was sold out from newsstands, convenience stores and bookstores. People even went to the newspapers’ offices for copies.

 

Newspaper companies preparing now for the demand

 

Kris Coratti from the Washington Post does not say how many extra copies they are set to print. She says that it might be similar to the Pope’s visit in 2015.

 

The New York Times is planning on 225,000 extra copies while selling outside their headquarters.

 

The Seattle Times will double the availability in coin boxes and stores.

 

The Los Angeles Times will triple its number and set up a kiosk outside its building too.

 

Conclusion

 

For anyone who wishes to buy a paper but couldn’t find one, he can wait for the prices to decrease, then go online. Obama’s cover now sells only a few dollars from $600. Or he can have a commemorative and personal one printed at professional Print Services in Perth or at a local printing company.